Planet of the Red Dust

planet dust

And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.” –Genesis 5:24

When James Adams crash-lands on a planet he believed to be uninhabitable, the last thing he expects is to find intelligent life, let alone human life.  At the opening of the book Planet of the Red Dust by N. Tolman Rudolph, James is burying his dead crewmembers from the exploratory spaceship the Wayfarer. He is surprised to find breathable atmosphere, and he sets about burying the dead.  As he performs what little funeral services he can, he looks up to see two people–an old man and a woman in her twenties–garbed in old-style clothes and speaking a strange language. Continue reading “Planet of the Red Dust”

Rereadable: The Book of Three

Book_of_ThreeI remember when I was little watching Disney’s The Black Cauldron.  During it, I fell in love with Gurgi (as a character–don’t judge me) and was terrified of the Horned King’s army.  Imagine my dismay when I finally read The Book of Three, quickly followed by The Black Cauldron and found that 1. Gurgi isn’t a cute little dog creature, and 2. The Horned King isn’t as creepy in the book as in the movie (although movie Horned King didn’t burn people alive in baskets as part of a pre-war macho exercise), and that movie Horned King was more a representation of Arawn.

With Disney picking up the rights to film the entire Chronicles of Prydain, I decided to buy the entire box set and start rereading them (and, honestly, I’m not sure why I never did finish the series.  I think The Castle of Llyr was checked out at my school’s library, and at the time I was too shy to put anything on hold…and then I moved on to the next Harry Potter book).  I must say, I am still in love with these books and am ashamed that I never did finish the series as a child/teen. Continue reading “Rereadable: The Book of Three”

Monster Boy by Ruth Fox

monster boy cover artGood evening, fellow readers!  Tonight, I’ve got a special treat for you.  It’s my first-ever review of a book I received free for the select purpose of writing a review.  You may be used to my old format of rambling my way through my impressions of the book.  This will continue, but I’ll also give a brief biography of the author at the bottom.  I’ll also give links to pages where you can purchase the book.  In that way, it’s slightly like an advertisement, but it’s the least I can do to show my appreciation for the free book.  And, as much as I like reading books, I love sharing the works of up-and-coming authors!  This will be the only time I give this so-called disclaimer.  From now on, I’ll assume you can figure it out for yourself.  Author bio + links to purchase = I got a free copy.  Anyway, on to the book!

Welcome to Silvershine! This city, on a little island in between New Zealand and Australia, is pretty much cut off from the rest of the world.  It has its own television programs, its own car manufacturers, its own smartphone factories.  It also has its own secrets.  You see, a vast wall cuts Silvershine in half.  North Silvershine is an idyllic city with safe neighborhoods where kids often run off to play Monster Tag at night.  South Silvershine, on the other hand, is cloaked in a dense yellow fog that corrodes metal and destroys any technology that’s exposed to it.  Monsters lurk within the fog, peering out through a hole in the wall, and North Silvershine’s residents wonder when the monsters will come through. Continue reading “Monster Boy by Ruth Fox”

Review: Alloy of Law

alloy of law coverI am pretty sure I’ve mentioned Brandon Sanderson in other posts.  In fact, I’m pretty sure that I’ve compared other novels to Brandon’s works, whether or not I was fair in my comparison.  So, if you’ve followed my blog, you would be right in assuming that I am a fan of Brandon Sanderson.  So, when I received Alloy of Law for a Christmas gift a few Christmases ago, you’d assume I would just hop right into the book and devour it.  Well, I’ve been nervous–very nervous–about this book because I knew I would compare it to the original Mistborn trilogy. I knew Mistborn before the title was changed to The Final Empire, first book of the Mistborn series. I was shocked when certain characters died, when other characters betrayed them, and I enjoyed every high-fantasy twist and turn.  So when I heard that the next trilogy (quadrology, soon?) would be a Western-style Mistborn, I was excited, but wary. Continue reading “Review: Alloy of Law”

Beatrysel by Johnny Worthen

beatrysel cover artBeatrysel, by Johnny Worthen, is a very interesting novel.  Set in Portland, Oregon, it centers around dark and occult deaths caused, if not by the self-made Mage Julian Cormac, then by someone close to him.

Julian has just come out of a drug-filled stupor prescribed by his psychiatrist after he exited a mental hospital to find that something is very wrong.  His friends the Crabs, so called because they frequent a quaint bookshop called the Crabtree, are being targeted by a serial killer that kills by luring their victims to their deaths by Magick. Continue reading “Beatrysel by Johnny Worthen”

Ellie Reads–Audiobook Edition

You may be looking at the title of this blog post and going, “Wait, Ellie. Your blog is about books you read, not books you listen to. What nonsense are you trying to pull?” Well, let me tell you something.

Once upon a time, I worked in a laboratory facility cleaning mouse cages. And the only thing that made it bearable was listening to music. Then, one day, my parents bought me the complete collection of the Chronicles of Narnia radio plays, and it was magical. I listened to the series once a year for all the years I worked there as a poor college student. Continue reading “Ellie Reads–Audiobook Edition”

I Am Not a Serial Killer

 Maybe I should rename this blog to, “Ellie Reads Sporadically.” I’m sorry! It’s not that I haven’t been reading lately, it’s just that life has gotten extremely busy. So, while I wait here at Jiffy Lube so they can make sure they did things correctly on my car, I decided to return to the world of book blog reviews. Pardon any autocorrect errors (hopefully I catch them all).

Recently, I attended Salt Lake Comic Con: FanX, a comic convention that is making San Diego Comic-Con nervous because of its similarity in names and the number of visitors it receives (it also helps that Salt Lake’s entry fee is only around $50-60 for basic multi-day entry, that all panels are free, and that there’s a strong author base represented there in a state that churns out authors and hopeful writers as fast as butter). One of the panels was, “I Am Not a Serial Killer: the journey from page to screen.” Continue reading “I Am Not a Serial Killer”