Review: Alloy of Law

alloy of law coverI am pretty sure I’ve mentioned Brandon Sanderson in other posts.  In fact, I’m pretty sure that I’ve compared other novels to Brandon’s works, whether or not I was fair in my comparison.  So, if you’ve followed my blog, you would be right in assuming that I am a fan of Brandon Sanderson.  So, when I received Alloy of Law for a Christmas gift a few Christmases ago, you’d assume I would just hop right into the book and devour it.  Well, I’ve been nervous–very nervous–about this book because I knew I would compare it to the original Mistborn trilogy. I knew Mistborn before the title was changed to The Final Empire, first book of the Mistborn series. I was shocked when certain characters died, when other characters betrayed them, and I enjoyed every high-fantasy twist and turn.  So when I heard that the next trilogy (quadrology, soon?) would be a Western-style Mistborn, I was excited, but wary. Continue reading “Review: Alloy of Law”

Beatrysel by Johnny Worthen

beatrysel cover artBeatrysel, by Johnny Worthen, is a very interesting novel.  Set in Portland, Oregon, it centers around dark and occult deaths caused, if not by the self-made Mage Julian Cormac, then by someone close to him.

Julian has just come out of a drug-filled stupor prescribed by his psychiatrist after he exited a mental hospital to find that something is very wrong.  His friends the Crabs, so called because they frequent a quaint bookshop called the Crabtree, are being targeted by a serial killer that kills by luring their victims to their deaths by Magick. Continue reading “Beatrysel by Johnny Worthen”

Ellie Reads–Audiobook Edition

You may be looking at the title of this blog post and going, “Wait, Ellie. Your blog is about books you read, not books you listen to. What nonsense are you trying to pull?” Well, let me tell you something.

Once upon a time, I worked in a laboratory facility cleaning mouse cages. And the only thing that made it bearable was listening to music. Then, one day, my parents bought me the complete collection of the Chronicles of Narnia radio plays, and it was magical. I listened to the series once a year for all the years I worked there as a poor college student. Continue reading “Ellie Reads–Audiobook Edition”

Veil of Darkness (Earthsoul Prophesies) Book Review

veil-of-darkness-coverOnce upon a time, I decided to support a local author that I’d seen at a city festival for several years in a row.  I’d had sour grapes each time I’d seen him, with his fancy table and his fancy books and his fancy signs.  “Why can’t I do that?” I thought glumly each time I saw him.  “Why can’t I get my books published and get a table at a city festival or two and sell my books?”

Well, I finally grew up and out of my self-centeredness and decided to try his books.  I’m always ready for a good epic fantasy, and I was ready to try this one. Continue reading “Veil of Darkness (Earthsoul Prophesies) Book Review”

The Longest Con Book Review

longest-con-coverThe Longest Con, by Michaelbrent Collings, is a book that Michaelbrent obviously wrote for himself.  The premise is this: at comic conventions, people come dressed up as monsters.  Well, monsters come dressed up as people, too, and in order to keep the body count down authors are hired to keep the monsters in their place.  Michaelbrent is one of those authors in this first-person narrative, called a Warder, and his job is to investigate monsters that are causing mayhem at the cons. Continue reading “The Longest Con Book Review”

The Unseen Trilogy

Every once in a while, like a magic spell, a book series comes along that takes me away to a magical place and never lets me go.  Harry Potter did that.  So, to a lesser extent, did Percy Jackson.  Uglies did a good job, too.  And now, I have another trilogy (and maybe more? *crosses fingers*) that I can add to my list of must-reads: The Unseen by Johnny Worthen. Continue reading “The Unseen Trilogy”

Witch and Wizard: A Cautionary Tale

witch and wizard coverHave you ever read a book that just grabbed you and never let you go, which you were a little embarrassed to admit you read because you’re an adult and you shouldn’t enjoy it as much as you do but you don’t care because it’s the most amazing book in the history of everything?

Well, sorry to burst your bubble, but Witch and Wizard isn’t it.

Written by James Patterson and Gabrielle Charbonnet, this book is lazy.  From the world building to the dialogue to the descriptions to the characters, this book is the epitome of why James Patterson’s idea of making his name a brand and letting ghostwriters do the work is a very bad idea. Continue reading “Witch and Wizard: A Cautionary Tale”