The Nightwalker

The Nightwalker, by Sebastian Fitzek, is a masterpiece of a psychological thriller. It is so good that I made the mistake of wanting to read a few chapters before bed, read a third of the book instead, and then was unable to sleep for an hour after that.

Leon Nader wakes in the middle of the night to find his wife crying, beaten, and packing frantically. He has no recollection of beating her, but when she refuses to answer his questions and rushes out of their apartment, he is struck with a terrible fear: what if he’s started sleepwalking again?

When he was a child, his foster parents found him, sleepwalking, holding a knife over his foster brother. Though his sleepwalking was supposedly cured, he is worried that his violent sleeping self has reappeared.

As Leon strives to learn the truth behind his wife’s flight and subsequent disappearance, he buys a head camera to track where he goes when he sleeps. What he discovers is something he never imagined: there are secret tunnels and hallways throughout his apartment complex, and his sleepwalking self apparently knows all about it. The more he looks, the more he wonders: is he more than a wife beater. Is he, perhaps, something even darker?

If you read this book, make sure you give yourself enough time. And don’t read it right before bed.

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What Immortal Hand

what immortal hand coverDo you ever read a book with the honest intent to write a review right afterwards, but life happens and then a couple of weeks pass and whoops, you haven’t written the blog yet?  Or is that just me?  Whoops.

As you may know, I am a fan of Johnny Worthen’s work.  I signed up for his email list last year at Salt Lake Comic Con, and this year, when he asked for readers and reviewers for his new book, What Immortal Hand, I immediately responded, “Yassss!” (If you’re tired of my reviews of Johnny’s books, get used to it.  I’ll probably end up reviewing all his books over time)

What Immortal Hand follows Michael Oswald, private investigator for an insurance company eager to prove disability fraud or other ways customers violated their plans and thus don’t have to pay out any insurance claims.  Michael doesn’t like working for the insurance company, but it pays his bills and allows him to travel endlessly. Continue reading “What Immortal Hand”

Monster Boy by Ruth Fox

monster boy cover artGood evening, fellow readers!  Tonight, I’ve got a special treat for you.  It’s my first-ever review of a book I received free for the select purpose of writing a review.  You may be used to my old format of rambling my way through my impressions of the book.  This will continue, but I’ll also give a brief biography of the author at the bottom.  I’ll also give links to pages where you can purchase the book.  In that way, it’s slightly like an advertisement, but it’s the least I can do to show my appreciation for the free book.  And, as much as I like reading books, I love sharing the works of up-and-coming authors!  This will be the only time I give this so-called disclaimer.  From now on, I’ll assume you can figure it out for yourself.  Author bio + links to purchase = I got a free copy.  Anyway, on to the book!

Welcome to Silvershine! This city, on a little island in between New Zealand and Australia, is pretty much cut off from the rest of the world.  It has its own television programs, its own car manufacturers, its own smartphone factories.  It also has its own secrets.  You see, a vast wall cuts Silvershine in half.  North Silvershine is an idyllic city with safe neighborhoods where kids often run off to play Monster Tag at night.  South Silvershine, on the other hand, is cloaked in a dense yellow fog that corrodes metal and destroys any technology that’s exposed to it.  Monsters lurk within the fog, peering out through a hole in the wall, and North Silvershine’s residents wonder when the monsters will come through. Continue reading “Monster Boy by Ruth Fox”

Beatrysel by Johnny Worthen

beatrysel cover artBeatrysel, by Johnny Worthen, is a very interesting novel.  Set in Portland, Oregon, it centers around dark and occult deaths caused, if not by the self-made Mage Julian Cormac, then by someone close to him.

Julian has just come out of a drug-filled stupor prescribed by his psychiatrist after he exited a mental hospital to find that something is very wrong.  His friends the Crabs, so called because they frequent a quaint bookshop called the Crabtree, are being targeted by a serial killer that kills by luring their victims to their deaths by Magick. Continue reading “Beatrysel by Johnny Worthen”

The Longest Con Book Review

longest-con-coverThe Longest Con, by Michaelbrent Collings, is a book that Michaelbrent obviously wrote for himself.  The premise is this: at comic conventions, people come dressed up as monsters.  Well, monsters come dressed up as people, too, and in order to keep the body count down authors are hired to keep the monsters in their place.  Michaelbrent is one of those authors in this first-person narrative, called a Warder, and his job is to investigate monsters that are causing mayhem at the cons. Continue reading “The Longest Con Book Review”

The Devil in Silver

devil in silver coverThe Devil in Silver, by Victor Lavalle, is a book I found in the unlikeliest of places: the dollar store.  Now, some of you may be going, “Oh Ellie, you didn’t grab a Dollar Tree book, did you?  All of those are castoffs with no real value.”  To which I reply, “Pooh pooh, some of these books are real gems lost to the tragedy of poor publicity and marketing.”

Now, there are some books that I find at the Dollar Tree that I absolutely love, and others are so-so.  This one’s a mix of good and so-so.  So…at least I only paid a dollar for this four hundred-plus page book. Continue reading “The Devil in Silver”