Blog Tour: Lies and Letters

lies and letters blog tour

I don’t usually like romances.  They’re too formulaic–beautiful, feminine woman falls for gruff man with a bad history.  Man breaks the woman’s heart, but the man eventually overcomes his faults and the woman and the man live happily ever after.  Or the author writes the woman as an empty shell with very little personality so that the reader can place herself (the reader in romances is usually a woman, though not always), and then the romantic interest is so stunningly handsome that the reader falls madly in love with him at the same time as the heroine.

I was a little bit nervous to take part in the blog tour for Lies and Letters by Ashtyn Newbold.  I didn’t want to be disappointed by another poorly-written romance taking place in what I now know is called the regency era in England.  But as I read, I was drawn in from page one.  You see, this romance isn’t like any other I’ve read: the woman is a shallow, selfish jerk, and that is plain to see from the very first page.  On page one, I was drawn in by the crisp writing, and by page two I absolutely hated Charlotte. Continue reading “Blog Tour: Lies and Letters”

Planet of the Red Dust

planet dust

And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.” –Genesis 5:24

When James Adams crash-lands on a planet he believed to be uninhabitable, the last thing he expects is to find intelligent life, let alone human life.  At the opening of the book Planet of the Red Dust by N. Tolman Rudolph, James is burying his dead crewmembers from the exploratory spaceship the Wayfarer. He is surprised to find breathable atmosphere, and he sets about burying the dead.  As he performs what little funeral services he can, he looks up to see two people–an old man and a woman in her twenties–garbed in old-style clothes and speaking a strange language. Continue reading “Planet of the Red Dust”

Rereadable: The Book of Three

Book_of_ThreeI remember when I was little watching Disney’s The Black Cauldron.  During it, I fell in love with Gurgi (as a character–don’t judge me) and was terrified of the Horned King’s army.  Imagine my dismay when I finally read The Book of Three, quickly followed by The Black Cauldron and found that 1. Gurgi isn’t a cute little dog creature, and 2. The Horned King isn’t as creepy in the book as in the movie (although movie Horned King didn’t burn people alive in baskets as part of a pre-war macho exercise), and that movie Horned King was more a representation of Arawn.

With Disney picking up the rights to film the entire Chronicles of Prydain, I decided to buy the entire box set and start rereading them (and, honestly, I’m not sure why I never did finish the series.  I think The Castle of Llyr was checked out at my school’s library, and at the time I was too shy to put anything on hold…and then I moved on to the next Harry Potter book).  I must say, I am still in love with these books and am ashamed that I never did finish the series as a child/teen. Continue reading “Rereadable: The Book of Three”

Monster Boy by Ruth Fox

monster boy cover artGood evening, fellow readers!  Tonight, I’ve got a special treat for you.  It’s my first-ever review of a book I received free for the select purpose of writing a review.  You may be used to my old format of rambling my way through my impressions of the book.  This will continue, but I’ll also give a brief biography of the author at the bottom.  I’ll also give links to pages where you can purchase the book.  In that way, it’s slightly like an advertisement, but it’s the least I can do to show my appreciation for the free book.  And, as much as I like reading books, I love sharing the works of up-and-coming authors!  This will be the only time I give this so-called disclaimer.  From now on, I’ll assume you can figure it out for yourself.  Author bio + links to purchase = I got a free copy.  Anyway, on to the book!

Welcome to Silvershine! This city, on a little island in between New Zealand and Australia, is pretty much cut off from the rest of the world.  It has its own television programs, its own car manufacturers, its own smartphone factories.  It also has its own secrets.  You see, a vast wall cuts Silvershine in half.  North Silvershine is an idyllic city with safe neighborhoods where kids often run off to play Monster Tag at night.  South Silvershine, on the other hand, is cloaked in a dense yellow fog that corrodes metal and destroys any technology that’s exposed to it.  Monsters lurk within the fog, peering out through a hole in the wall, and North Silvershine’s residents wonder when the monsters will come through. Continue reading “Monster Boy by Ruth Fox”